About Us

Your Telos is your destiny, what you are meant to evolve into, if you live your life to your full potential. Telos is built on a simple idea - if each of us fulfill our purpose, so will humanity as a whole. It’s about personal and social change.

How does it work?

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    Telos is built on a simple idea - if each of us fulfill our potential and purpose, so will humanity as a whole. It's about personal and social change.

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    Take the Telos test, and any other quizzes you like, to learn about yourself, and help Telos understand you.

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    Then get one personalized "nudge" a week - a suggestion for what will move you forward on your journey.

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    Feedback on what you get, and if it worked - and help build the wisdom of Telos for you and others.

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    And when you find something that really worked for you, something wonderful, spread it to others, to help build a stronger, kinder, wiser world.

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    We're bombarded with content online, but the algorithms that show us this content are driven by money and eyeballs. Telos is driven by your and other peoples' feedback on what is deeply helpful, good, inspiring, and right for all of us.

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    Telos is free To keep it free for everyone else, you can subscribe for $1.50 per week, and cancel anytime. Subscribers get additional support and services and opportunities to connect.

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    What if, together, we built something that crowdsourced the deep wisdom and experience of 1 billion humans, to help 1 billion people take the next step on their journey.

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    It might save the world.

What’s a nudge?

Anything that moves you forward. Anything you love. It could be a quiz, a quote, an exercise, a chance to connect with someone, an idea, a product, an act of service, or a challenge.

Your feedback will teach Telos what works best for you. Over time, you’ll develop practices and habits you love.

Why does it work?

We’re surrounded by content - products, advertising, news, posts.

But the algorithms that show us this content is driven by factors like money and eyeballs.

Telos is driven by one thing - your and other users’ feedback on what is deeply helpful, good, inspiring, and right for them.

How does it work?

  • Telos is free.

  • To keep it free for everyone else, you can subscribe here for just $1.50 per week, and cancel anytime.

  • Subscribers get additional support and services and opportunities to connect.

What’s the dream?

What if we built something that crowdsourced the deep wisdom of 1 billion humans, to help 1 billion people take the next step on their journey.

It might save the world.

Watch the video for more introduction to Telos:

More Frequently Asked Questions

This is the first item's accordion body. It is shown by default, until the collapse plugin adds the appropriate classes that we use to style each element. These classes control the overall appearance, as well as the showing and hiding via CSS transitions. You can modify any of this with custom CSS or overriding our default variables. It's also worth noting that just about any HTML can go within the .accordion-body, though the transition does limit overflow.

No, Telos is a social enterprise. As you can tell from the site, we’re not trying to make money at every corner. Part of our mission is to try and make some tools that are often behind paywalls or in the hands of expensive professionals, available to everyone for free. Our fundamental purpose and commitment is to help people and change the world. This is why Telos has no investors, no advertising, and is 100% powered by small online subscriptions or support from members of our community.
We prefer a social enterprise to a nonprofit because social enterprises allow for staff and leadership to control the content on the site, whereas nonprofits require disinterested and independent volunteer board members to have full control. This often makes nonprofit models highly consensus and process oriented, risk averse, controversy-allergic, and less capable of dynamic innovation. Non-profits are also funded in part by governments who provide deductions on donations to them, which in turn places many restrictions on what they can say and do politically and otherwise. This kind of nonprofit model makes sense in some cases, but doesn’t make sense for Telos.

This is the third item's accordion body. It is hidden by default, until the collapse plugin adds the appropriate classes that we use to style each element. These classes control the overall appearance, as well as the showing and hiding via CSS transitions. You can modify any of this with custom CSS or overriding our default variables. It's also worth noting that just about any HTML can go within the .accordion-body, though the transition does limit overflow.

This is the second item's accordion body. It is hidden by default, until the collapse plugin adds the appropriate classes that we use to style each element. These classes control the overall appearance, as well as the showing and hiding via CSS transitions. You can modify any of this with custom CSS or overriding our default variables. It's also worth noting that just about any HTML can go within the .accordion-body, though the transition does limit overflow.

This is the third item's accordion body. It is hidden by default, until the collapse plugin adds the appropriate classes that we use to style each element. These classes control the overall appearance, as well as the showing and hiding via CSS transitions. You can modify any of this with custom CSS or overriding our default variables. It's also worth noting that just about any HTML can go within the .accordion-body, though the transition does limit overflow.

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@Telos Life Connections 2024